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Old Mar 11, 2010, 06:54 PM   #1
Flavus
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Bulgarian Archaeologists Make Breakthrough in Ancient Thrace Tomb

Dear fellow collectors,
Just saw an interesting article and would like to share it with everybody:

"One of Bulgaria’s top Ancient Thrace sites, the Starosel Tomb, has been dated to the 4th century BC after years of research.
With German help a team of archaeologists of the Bulgarian National History Museum led by Dr. Ivan Hristov has managed to estimate the timing of the construction of the largest underground temple on the Balkan Peninsula, the Starosel Tomb, located in the Hisarya Municipality, Plovdiv District...
http://www.novinite.com/view_news.php?id=114097

All the best,
Flavus

A coin found nead the Starosel tombs shows the doubleheaded labrys, the coat of arms of the family of Amatokos II. Photo by BGNES
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Old Mar 11, 2010, 10:33 PM   #2
GMoneti
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It's good that they had the chance to get the stuff carbon dated and get an exact dating. Apparently the lab in Germany is top notch, so it must be pretty acurate.

For more images of the mound and the complex here is a link:

http://www.balkanmysteries.com/bg/?p=99&lang=bg

The terrain in that part of Thrace is really nice. Along with the mystique of so many Thracian mounds all over the places, it's very special.

I was just reading in Yurukova's book about Amatokos II, and it says that he first appeared in the historical records in 357 BC in an agreement between Athens and three Thracian rulers, one of which was him. It says that the agreement was about the payment of annual tribute by the Greek cities on the Aegean coast of Thrace. It's interesting that apparently at least some of his coins were struck at Maroneia and I wonder if the vine design of the reverse of this coin of his is suggestive of that.
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Old Mar 12, 2010, 07:39 AM   #3
Flavus
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Thank you, Georgi. I personally had no idea about such complexity of Thracian society. I always thought it was just a bunch of tribes with "kings". This story (and the history) is just fascinating.
That's what I found about Hisarya, in which municipality the tomb is located:

"Hisarya (also spelled Hisar or Hissarya) is a small resort town in Bulgaria, in Plovdiv Region. Located in the outskirts of the Sredna Gora mountain range, it boast a wonderful climate and over two dozen different mineral springs, which make it a favourite spa for many Bulgarian and foreign tourists.
Because of these springs, the town was founded thousands of years ago. Some pre-historic remains have been found in what is now the town centre. Later, it became a Thracian city, and when Thrace fell to the Romans and became a Roman province, Hissar became a Roman town - one of the three most important towns in the province. At various times it was called Augusta, Diocletianopolis (after emperor Diocletian) and a couple of other names. It was a famous resort even in those times, which is proved by the fact that emperor Septimius Severus himself visited the city...
Many Roman ruins are still visible everywhere - public buildings, a small amphitheatre, the barracks of the Roman garrison, the foundations of a couple of the oldest churches in Bulgaria, as well as the best preserved Roman fortress in Bulgaria. The southern gate is known as "The Camels", owing to the fact that it had broken in the middle and looked like two camels facing each other, before it was partially restored in the late XX century..."

From http://www.nationmaster.com/encyclopedia/Hisarya
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Old Mar 17, 2010, 05:18 PM   #4
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There are a couple variations of coins similar to the one shown from this time period. The thickness really sets them apart from other Greek especially from this time period. I have three of them.
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