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-   -   Britannic coinage and the Tetrarchy - a reprise (http://www.ancients.info/forums/showthread.php?t=3504)

jamesicus Dec 30, 2017 11:56 AM

Britannic coinage and the Tetrarchy - a reprise
 
I haven't posted on this Forum for a long time, although my enthusiasm for Roman Imperial coins - especially those of this thread title - has remained undiminished. And, I have always greatly enjoyed the discussions generated here.

I have endured a number of medical procedures and health issues in recent years, but I am now reasonably healthy in my eighty eighth year (seventy eight years of collecting and researching Roman Imperial coins) and I continue to maintain several web sites and pages devoted to this pursuit. I invite fellow enthusiasts to visit them - I provide links in my signature block.

My special interest still lies in all aspects of the Britannic coinage and the Tetrarchy as I define it on my website and I solicit input - criticism, corrections, suggestions, etc.

jamesicus Jan 1, 2018 06:06 PM

The discussions in the following threads contain much
in-depth information (plus photos of seldom encountered
coins) relating to Britannic coinage and the Tetrarchy.
If you have a deep interest in the background of many
of the recent developments in the study of this
coinage, you may enjoy reading these subjects:

Constantius' Boulogne mint

Maximianus Herculius, AE Follis - London or Continental Mint?

Unmarked London Mint Type

Invasion coinage of Constantius

jamesicus Jan 6, 2018 11:40 AM

Attributing Tetrarchic folles:

Bronze with a silver wash as cataloged in THE ROMAN IMPERIAL COINAGE (RIC), Volume VI.

I employ the Imperial name forms used in the headers by Sutherland here. The following depiction includes the alternate name forms frequently used by collectors, dealers and some authors of historical texts and reference documents:

DIOCLETIAN ........................ (no other names commonly used)
MAXIMIAN HERCULIUS ........ Maximianus, Herculius
CONSTANTIUS .................... Constantius I, Constantius Chlorus
GALERIUS MAXIMIAN ........... Galerius
SEVERUS ........................... Severus II,
MAXIMINUS ........................ Maximinus II, Maximinus Daia, Daza
CONSTANTINE ..................... Constantine I, Constantinus

Note: Caution should be exercised when attributing folles of Galerius Maximian (Caius Galerius Valerius Maximianus) & Maximian Herculius (Marcus Aurelius Valerius Maximianus) due to the similarity of their titulature. Galerius Maximian was both Caesar and Augustus during this time period whereas Maximian Herculius was always only Augustus. Therefor coins bearing the titulature MAXIMIANVS plus NOBIL CAES, NOB CAES, NOBIL C, etc., can only be those of Galerius Maximian. There is a special problem with Galerius as Augustus coins: The titulature is mostly exactly the same as that of Maximian Herculius and frequently the only way to differentiate between the two is by the portraiture on the coin obverse.

jamesicus Jan 31, 2018 03:05 PM

I have now restored the photo images that I had inadvertantly deleted from some of my posts.

4to2centophilia Feb 17, 2018 06:28 AM

Great job. You are relentless in your pursuit. Admirable.

jamesicus Feb 17, 2018 01:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 4to2centophilia (Post 18041)
Great job. You are relentless in your pursuit. Admirable.

Thank you - I canít help myself! :) Here is a rare London Mint Serverus as Augustus variant (not in RIC) that I acquired:


IMP SEVERVS PIVS FEL AVG .................................... GENIO POPV - LI ROMANI


CT (Cloke & Toone), No. 4.04.004, 26 July 306 - Spring 307, Rarity: RR

jamesicus Feb 18, 2018 12:56 PM

Constantius died at Eboracum (York) in Britain during a campaign against the warlike tribes of the North on 25 July 306. Just before he died, Constantius conferred Imperium on his son, Flavius Valerius Constantinus (later Constantine the Great). The army commanded by Constantius wanted Constantine proclaimed Augustus to succeed his father, however, Galerius Maximian, the now de-facto senior Augustus elevated Severus to Augustus of the West (in accordance with pecedent) and affirmed Constantine as Caesar (of the West?).

Author note: I believe that the Tetrarchy began to fall apart at this point in time. Surely Severus should automatically have assumed the position/title of Augustus of the West (otherwise what would have been his position/title?) and then selected his own Caesar in accordance with precedent. Of course, Constantius conferring Imperium on his son and Galerius Maximian subsequently affirming him as Caesar threw a monkey wrench in the works and Galerius Maximian was stuck with the task of sorting it all out.

jamesicus Feb 19, 2018 01:23 PM

Constantius died at Eboracum (York) in Britain during a campaign against the warlike tribes of the North on 25 July 306. Just before he died, Constantius conferred Imperium on his son, Flavius Valerius Constantinus (later Constantine the Great). The army commanded by Constantius wanted Constantine proclaimed Augustus to succeed his father, however, Galerius Maximian, the now de-facto senior Augustus elevated Severus to Augustus of the West (in accordance with pecedent) and affirmed Constantine as Caesar (of the West?).

I believe that the Tetrarchy began to fall apart at this point in time. Surely Severus should automatically have assumed the position/title of Augustus of the West (otherwise what would have been his position/title?) and then selected his own Caesar in accordance with precedent. Of course, Constantius conferring Imperium on his son and Galerius Maximian subsequently affirming him as Caesar threw a monkey wrench in the works and Galerius Maximian was stuck with the task of sorting it all out.


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